March272013
wuglife:

lingllama:

Can vowels come too?
[Picture: Background: 8-piece pie-style color split with alternating shades of blue. Foreground: Linguist Llama meme, a white llama facing forward, wearing a red scarf. Top text: “Ain’t no party like a fricative party” Bottom text: “’Cuz a fricative party don’t stop”]
submitter: My fiance (a non-linguist) came up with this joke in a dream! I was amazed.

You can join any time, this party is +CONTINUANT.

Dead.

wuglife:

lingllama:

Can vowels come too?

[Picture: Background: 8-piece pie-style color split with alternating shades of blue. Foreground: Linguist Llama meme, a white llama facing forward, wearing a red scarf. Top text: “Ain’t no party like a fricative party” Bottom text: “’Cuz a fricative party don’t stop”]

submitter: My fiance (a non-linguist) came up with this joke in a dream! I was amazed.

You can join any time, this party is +CONTINUANT.

Dead.

3PM
hjteaglefeather:

deerekaj:

Now everyone shutup. #eatadickprop8 #humans #gayrights

This woman I my hero her unwavering stance gmh.

This is perfect.

hjteaglefeather:

deerekaj:

Now everyone shutup. #eatadickprop8 #humans #gayrights

This woman I my hero her unwavering stance gmh.

This is perfect.

February122013
To my man

=)

To my man

=)

(Source: lgbtlaughs)

February102013

When a guy can sing and play guitar

whatshouldbetchescallme:

image

This, among many other reasons his how I feel about my man =)  Love you <3

11PM

The Trevor Project

1-866-488-7386

I love this.

(Source: nicedynmite, via tyleroakley)

11PM
meanguistics:

fuckyeahlinguisticsmemes:

aafrophone:

haha Oh, Phonology
from http://facebook.com/lolphonology


UGH.  So very relevant to my life last semester.  Phonology is #TRIFLIN!

I remember this in my phonology class&#8230;

meanguistics:

fuckyeahlinguisticsmemes:

aafrophone:

haha Oh, Phonology

from http://facebook.com/lolphonology

UGH.  So very relevant to my life last semester.  Phonology is #TRIFLIN!

I remember this in my phonology class…

(Source: aafrophysling)

11PM

collegehumor:

Very Mary-Kate: Lost in Translation [Click to watch]

Parlez-vous French or whatever?

I’ve spoken with people like this in French before. lol

french lol 

11PM

tyleroakley:

One big room full of bad bitches.

These bad bitches look pretty cool in this image.

(Source: vincethestick, via tyleroakley)

11PM
allthingslinguistic:

tumblinguists:

Those two words are afgano [avɣano] (Afghani) and Afganistan [avɣanisˈtãn] (Afghanistan).
The letter &lt;v&gt; in Spanish has come to be pronounced /b/ (with allophonic [β̞]), such that &lt;viejo&gt; is pronounced /bi̯exo/ and &lt;hombre viejo&gt; is [ombɾe β̞i̯eχo].
The phonotactic structure of Spanish voices fricatives /f, θ, s/ before another voiced consonant, and the only occurences of /f/ before a voiced consonant is in these two words.
I would like to say that this is changing, and that I’ve noticed some speakers actually use [v] instead of [b]. All speakers I’ve noticed this in are either natively bilingual Americans or are from near the Mexican-American border—people who have a high chance of exposure to English, which uses &lt;v&gt; and /v/.

Whereupon I spend ten minutes racking my limited Spanish vocabulary for more examples of f, b, or v before a voiced consonant to try to disprove this. There’s Africa, but Wikcionario says that it’s pronounced with /f/. Maybe before a nasal? Or I guess this text could just be correct, but that seems less fun.  

This is actually really interesting.

allthingslinguistic:

tumblinguists:

Those two words are afgano [avɣano] (Afghani) and Afganistan [avɣanisˈtãn] (Afghanistan).

The letter <v> in Spanish has come to be pronounced /b/ (with allophonic [β̞]), such that <viejo> is pronounced /bi̯exo/ and <hombre viejo> is [ombɾe β̞i̯eχo].

The phonotactic structure of Spanish voices fricatives /f, θ, s/ before another voiced consonant, and the only occurences of /f/ before a voiced consonant is in these two words.

I would like to say that this is changing, and that I’ve noticed some speakers actually use [v] instead of [b]. All speakers I’ve noticed this in are either natively bilingual Americans or are from near the Mexican-American border—people who have a high chance of exposure to English, which uses <v> and /v/.

Whereupon I spend ten minutes racking my limited Spanish vocabulary for more examples of f, b, or v before a voiced consonant to try to disprove this. There’s Africa, but Wikcionario says that it’s pronounced with /f/. Maybe before a nasal? Or I guess this text could just be correct, but that seems less fun.  

This is actually really interesting.

(via allthingslinguistic)

January182013

TOMORROW!!!

I see my boyfriend tomorrow.  I’m dying of anticipation.  I miss him so much. afsfdjljlkdfahidiuhvq

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